Risk Without Reward

This morning, as I was walking across campus, my mind was racing with the events of the past few days. The murders of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, now counted among the continued, senseless murders of black and brown people; the swirling anger and vitriol that encompasses our national landscape–the blaming and finger pointing; the senseless killing in the line of action of Dallas police officers Lorne Ahrens, Michael Smith, Michael Krol, Patrick Zamarripa, and DART officer Brent Thompson; the violence that has occurred in Tennessee, south Georgia, and St. Louis. There is so much. There is too much. It is so clear that in a system of privilege and oppression, eventually, everyone starts to lose. 

But the thing is, at the same time that I can and should feel legitimate anger, fear, and sadness, the reality is, I still feel pretty damn safe. Because I am a highly educated, middle class white woman who lives in a predominantly white town, around a predominantly white university. My partner is white. My family members are white. So although there are plenty of things that I feel pretty awful about, the reality is that I still feel very secure for myself and the ones I love most.

The big issue that I’m dealing with this week is along the lines of “What do I say?” and “What should I do?” and, frankly “What about when I say/do the wrong thing and hurt/offend/piss off/oppress someone?” Never once in my life has it ever crossed my mind that I am going to be shot and killed by police while living my every day life. I don’t wake up in the morning or go to bed worried about what might happen if I get pulled over for speeding, or what might happen if my partner neglects to change a taillight and gets pulled over on the way to work at 4:30am, or if my sister might be walking down the street in Boston and might look a little “suspicious,” or if my Dad decides to have a bonfire in the backyard and the neighbors think it’s a problem. I never think about the result of my loved ones interacting with law enforcement being their sudden and tragic death. But people of color in America? They do have to worry about this. And the reason for this incredibly jarring disparity is white privilege.

And yet, against this stark reality check, I still struggle with questions about what to do and how to react to racism, oppression, and racial violence.  A lifetime of white privilege has made me feel that I’m almost always right, and if not, I gave it a darn good try and I should probably get a gold star for my efforts anyway, so it’s hard to admit that the root of the aforementioned struggle is the fear that I am going to potentially be utterly and completely wrong, shitty, and possibly racist in my thoughts and reactions. My friends, colleagues, and students of color are worried about getting killed and I’m worried about getting called out. The unjust absurdity of this is not lost on me, but that doesn’t change the fact that I need to deal with this to be part of the solution instead of part of the problem. This week is hardly the first time that I’ve reckoned with this, and if I know anything about the pervasiveness of white privilege and white supremacy, I doubt it will be the last.

Fears of being “wrong,” of being rebuked, of being accidentally racist, of not recognizing white supremacist attitudes and behaviors, of not having something good to contribute to the conversation…these can often deter white folks from entering into conversation and action as we start to understand and realize the impact of racism. Privilege tends to protect us from those fears, instilling in us that we have a “right”to be in charge, to be expert, and to be given a high-five for our contributions. (Side note: white privilege also often intersects with various forms of identity oppression, so I have plenty of fears of being heard and respected as a woman, but that’s a different blog for a different day).

It’s uncomfortable to start to realize things, to start to wake up to the fact that you thought you had life figured out but oh my goodness, you had no idea. To think that you’ve got the rationale and the logic and the explanation, but there are people looking back at you like you are just absolutely not even in the ballpark of objective reality. To be called out for any number of things. It feels like shit. But I’m a firm believer that sometimes we need to get up close and personal with shit because our world is so horribly messed up. The systems in place are so unjust, violent, and pervasive. And if you’re privileged, most of the time you get to float around and above it all, relatively unscathed. In some ways, experiencing that horrible feeling is an invitation into understanding, and if you are starting to experience that, I invite you to lean into it. Lean into it with some degree of self-care, forgiveness, and support and connection with other anti-racist white folks. I invite you to consider asking yourself how you can show up and take risks, be uncomfortable, be wrong, make mistakes, apologize authentically, seek understanding, and don’t expect any reward to come your way. Consider how you can do that in the pursuit of an equal and just society in which all individuals and groups are able to freely and equally participate without fear of being shot in broad daylight at a traffic stop.

 

 

 

Fall Is Not Just for White Girls

I continue to be annoyed with the deluge of references to how much white girls allegedly love pumpkin spice and “all things fall.” Why?

Everyone experiences autumn (depending on your geographic location), last time I checked. Constantly making the assertion that there is some inextricable link between “fall things” (like pumpkin flavored food and beverages, cool-weather appropriate attire, apples, baking, appreciation of nature, etc) and whiteness is RACIST. Suggesting that these activities are exclusive to white people is exclusionary, stupid, and let me say it again, racist.

Furthermore, many of the alleged “basic white girl” activities frequently alluded to in these references involve the use of leisure time or purchasing of items that are not considered necessities (like a $4 latte). This adds the layer of race-related-classism implicit in this conversation. Why aren’t you talking about POCs loving PSLs, folks? Because you don’t think that POCs go to Starbucks, perhaps? Why’s that? Maybe examine the assumptions in that.

White people already own most of the stuff in this country. Stop acting like we own seasons, too. It’s not cute, or funny. It’s unexamined white privilege and supremacy.

Lest we think that this little trend is exclusively racist, let’s take a look at the sexism implicit in the “white girls love fall” idea. For starters, grown women are not girls. Let’s just put that on record. Buying canned pumpkin does not make me childlike. Being a woman should not make me childlike, either. No one ever refers to young male adults as “boys,” do they? Please stop perpetuating this “girls” thing.

Also implicit in this trend is the idea that somehow, being female renders one completely unable to act like an intelligent and rational human being when faced with something that calls to mind an emotional response. Does the smell of pumpkin spice and the crunch of fallen leaves remind me of fond memories of childhood holidays? Yes. When I smell pumpkin spice, am I suddenly a blabbering idiot who can only speak in OMG and LOL because my ovaries have flooded my brain with sappy “girl” hormones? No.

So please just stop. Fall is for everyone.