These are some examples of workshops and sessions that Ashley has presented and facilitated for student staff  and student leader audiences. Each audience is unique and a learning-centered approach is attentive to their needs and context. Depending on the audience size, the same training may be presented twice in one day. Sessions may also be combined to create a full-day training. Additionally, sessions can be adapted into an interactive keynote or lecture style for larger audiences (100+). Contact Ashley to inquire about developing an interactive workshop that meets your goals and your team’s needs, based on these examples or another topic.

Half-Day Workshops

Breaking Up with Busyness (for undergraduates)

  • Description: Busyness, the constant need in our lives to be occupied by tasks, responsibilities, work, and activity, is often misinterpreted as productivity or value. The pressure to be busy can be unhealthy and pervasive in the lives of student leaders. With five tips to “break up” with busyness, this session will challenge undergraduate student audiences to rethink what it means to work better instead of more. This session focuses on students’ individual decision-making, communication with others, and strategies.
  • Outcomes
      • Students will reflect and share about “busyness” in their lives.
      • Students will set and commit to specific goals.
      • Student will develop and practice strategies to reach those goals.
      • Students will start the process of breaking up with busyness!

Priorities, Goals, and Action Planning Sequence

  • Description: Managing priorities and time to reach goals is a challenging process for new student leaders and student staff. This half-day session focuses on skill building, reflection, and planning to help students integrate a new leadership role into their life. This session engages students in considering the amount of time they actually have, what their priorities and goals are, how they can create plans to meet those goals, and strategies to use when they are struggling. This session is customizable to include specific requirements and expectations of student leaders and staff in your organization.
  • Outcomes
    • Students will reflect on the activities and obligations that require their time and energy.
    • Students will apply a framework for selecting priorities to their activities and obligations.
    • Students will set specific goals to focus on the priorities that they identify as most important.

Introduction to Student Learning and Development in the Residential Setting (Resident Assistants/Advisors)

  • Description: Student Learning and Development Theory are the foundation of student affairs work. Even though most Resident Assistants and Advisors are not formally trained in these theories, their every day work is informed by the application of theory to practice. Our student staff and leaders increasingly ask us “why?” about their roles and work with students. This session helps to answer many of those “why” questions, and equips student staff to begin to create their own “toolbox” of theories to draw on when engaging with resident students. The major theory in this session is Baxter-Magolda and King’s Self-Authorship Theory and Learning Partnerships Model. This session can be customized to address specific identified developmental needs of different student populations, or to tie-in to a theoretical framing used by your organization.
  • Outcomes
    • Students will identify two reasons to focus residential life work on student learning and development.
    • Students will articulate how using Student Development Theory applies to being a Resident Assistant/Advisor.
    • Students will be able to summarize the concepts of key Student Development Theories.
    • Students will be able to identify specific group and individual interventions to promote student development in the residence halls.

Introduction to Student Learning and Development for New Students (Orientation Leaders, First Year Mentors/Leaders)

  • Description: Student Learning and Development Theory are the foundation of student affairs work. Even though most Orientation Leaders and First Year Mentors are not formally trained in these theories, their every day work is informed by the application of theory to practice. Our student staff and leaders increasingly ask us “why?” about their roles and work with students. This session helps to answer many of those “why” questions, and equips student staff to begin to create their own “toolbox” of theories to draw on when engaging with resident students. The major theories in this session are Baxter-Magolda and King’s Self-Authorship Theory and Learning Partnerships Model and Schlossberg’s Transition Theory. This session can be customized to address specific identified developmental needs of different student populations, or to tie-in to a theoretical framing used by your organization.
  • Outcomes
    • Students will identify two reasons to focus work with new students on student learning and development.
    • Students will articulate how using Student Development Theory applies to their role.
    • Students will be able to summarize the concepts of key Student Development Theories.
    • Students will be able to identify specific group and individual interventions to promote student development during orientation/transition to college life.

This session pairs well with Introduction to Student Learning and Development in the Residential Setting for a full-day training! 


Strategies for Facilitating Student Learning and Development in the Residential Setting (Resident Assistants/Advisors)

  • Description: This session focuses on skill building and practice for the multiple ways Resident Assistants and Advisors facilitate student learning and development with their residents. Strategies such as one-on-one conversations, facilitating group activities, mediating roommate conflicts, and conducting helping and referral conversations are important skills for RAs, but are not natural for everyone. This session helps RAs to build foundational interpersonal and facilitation skills, practice specific strategies, and depending on your department’s model, practice lesson plans/facilitation guides or work on developing their own plan for a strategy. This session can be modified to cover strategy types or outcomes specific to your organization.
  • Outcomes
      • RAs will be able to utilize skills for effectively engaging others in a variety of strategies to enhance learning and development.
        • Such as: 1-1 Conversations, Group Conversations/Activities, Roommate Conversations/Mediations, Helping and Referral Conversations.
      • RAs will be able to explain the steps to prepare for facilitating each of the strategies within the workshop.
      • RAs will practice facilitating each of the strategies within the workshop.